Share on facebook

opinion

Horse sense

Usha Pokharel

Of course, the president will ride an elephant and so will the prime minister. For the fun of it, imagine our president, prime minister and other dignitaries riding on a fully decorated hauda: a seat fastened on the back of an elephant.

By Usha Pokharel

The other day, as I was walking past Lagankhel, I saw a number of vehicles waiting in queue for petrol and diesel in front of a gas station. There were motorbikes, cars and jeeps, huge trucks, tippers and buses waiting for their turn. The line stretching from Nepal Army’s petrol station was so long that it had almost reached the end of Satdobato junction. This long queue inspired some introspection. First I thought about the motorbikes which outnumbered all the other vehicles in the line. “What if we never received petroleum for transportation and electricity was a thing of the past? What would life be like?” I asked myself.

Motorbikes will go out of sight. Motorbike does not have a long history in Nepali roads. Motor scooters had become popular only in the 1960s. So bikers will, most likely, go back to using regular bikes—without engine. “What about the people who use cars?” One may ask. Well, Victoria coaches drawn by horses will become a new status symbol, one more time. After all they were very popular during the 1700s. 

Coaches were used for long-distance travel in those days. It would take more than 5 days to reach Pokhara, so what? They would stop at places, passengers would get on or off, and teams of horses would be replaced to give a break to the tired beasts and to maintain the speed at an average of about 11 kilometers per hour. Special coaches would even make twenty-five kilometers per day. 

They would make for a “good day´s travel.” Let us not forget elephant ride. Elephant riding will become very prestigious as only the only rich will be able to keep elephants. Of course, the president will ride an elephant and so will the prime minister. For the fun of it, imagine our president, prime minister and other dignitaries riding on a fully decorated hauda: a seat fastened on the back of an elephant. The onlookers will grace horse-drawn buggies with wonder. With all such changes, public transportation system will get a completely different look.

As regards buses, they will be horse-driven too. I am not kidding. In the 17th century (1662 to be precise) Blaise Pascal invented the first public bus (horse-drawn), regular route, schedule and fare system. It will be much easier for us because we already have all those in place. Horses will be greater in demand, as each household will want to have a horse just like having a car at home now. Cheap horse-drawn carriages and rickshaws will once again become the talk of the town. And they will replace the tempos and mini buses. Elephants will be used as heavy transport vehicles; they will replace the tippers and trucks. Or they could pull tippers and trucks. 

Our municipality will have to take extra measures to keep the city clean and the government will have found a new method to solve manure shortage. Apart from horses, the donkeys will find their places, as people who cannot afford horses will have carriages drawn by donkeys to get their children to schools. Mini-horse-drawn carriages will replace Nano. Taxis will be replaced by horses-on-rent with clock driven meters. As for the fare, it will depend on how long it takes you to get from one place to another. Distance will matter little. The petrol pumps will be replaced by horse-feeding centers. With horse as new transport, marriage will become even more colorful as the horses and palanquins will be more colorfully decorated. 

The janti will come on horseback and the bride will be taken to her in-law’s home in palanquins lifted by kahars, palanquin carriers. Being a kahar will be as good a profession as that of modern day driver. Kahars will be paid better for they will work as security persons too. A person will then need a martial art certificate to get the job of a kahar. Those who cannot afford a palanquin will use a cheaper means: Chariots. Chariots will be used in to taking away brides to their in-laws’ homes. This will not be a new thing though. Thousands of years ago the people in Egypt and Greece would ride chariots. 

Let us imagine Nepal in this new setting. There will be floods of tourists coming in to see a nation going backwards in time when the whole world is moving forward. Nepal will make headlines in the world newspapers: “Nepal- a nation going backwards in time.” Nepal will become a number one tourist destination. Hotels will run out of rooms and bed and breakfast will be a common name for every household in the valley. 

The tourists will be curious to know how we made it possible, how we could manage to preserve the old culture without going forward so far as transportation is concerned. Of course no one will ever remember the reality of the situation that brought the country to this state. So watch out, this might be the right time to remember that nice, sturdy horse that your grandparents had sold. It is just possible that the person who bought it still has its offspring. May be you should hurry and make a booking. Who knows when you might need it! The indications are already there: The government is widening the roads. 

Soon enough we will have roads to accommodate horses. That will be the start of moving backwards in time. So next time, there is subsidy in budget announcement, go ahead and buy a horse for yourself because you will be using it quite soon. Otherwise you might find yourself singing: Hatti, ghodapalki, jai kanhaiyalalki (elephants, horses and palanquins, praise be to Lord Krishna).

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

[The same article was published in Republica, the English daily, in Kathmandu.]

The views expressed in this article are the author's own and do not necessarily reflect Nepali Samaj UK’s editorial policy.

[Important note: Dear valued reader, you are also requested to send in your opinion on contemporary issues, and others related to Nepal and Nepalese, to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . We would appreciate if you can keep your article length around or below 1,000 words. It may be edited for the purpose of clarity and space. Besides, you can also mail us your photograph for publication.]

Education in real sense

Ishor N Rijal

Having availed of all sort of modern technology such as internet, mobiles, television, access to state-of-the-art libraries, hospitals, schools, colleges is not enough to be civilized. We should also be able to fathom others in the society and trade respects.

By Ishor N Rijal

Come March, and local newspapers in capital city– and other parts of the country too – will be flooded with advertisements calling for new admission in private/Montessori/ KG schools.  Just going by their enticing adverts which are full of promises, a complete novice to the situation can easily and immediately conclude that past are the days to look out for quality education elsewhere; we have no dearth of every kind of qualitative education provider within the country.

It is obviously a good (if not very) fleeting business for the newspapers and other media who are ready to crook down to any limit for getting more adverts. And, equally good is the fact that the unscrupulous money that the private schools make charging parents under various titles is going to be mobilized thus at least maintaining a sort of ‘economic equilibrium’. But the million dollar question is: are the private schools really doing what they are promising? Or simply the gullible parents are being hoodwinked to pay fees through their nose for a ‘hazy return’?

As I was also involved in the (private) education sector and thus have got chance to closely look the real happenings a few years back, I must admit to the fact that only a few educational institutions have been successful in giving education in true sense.  While the point I am raising here is ‘education’ in a broader sense, I have found that many parents –and worse, many educators too—have no clear-cut distinction between what education really is and the bookish short-term memory knowledge.

What many of us now call education is a matter of gathering information and knowledge from books. It simply teaches one to learn some technique to get good grades in exams: not in life. The real problem is that we have no idea of what education truly means and what it should do to one. So much so, we have been equating education in the same manner as we do with the value of land or other assets.  The education system is instilling in pupils how to be able to earn more; and not about how one should fulfil his or her social responsibility, maintain moral character, and most importantly, to be a human being in the society.

It is obvious to anticipate civilized manner and responsible deeds from an educated person. Life in the western countries, and in Europe, has been easier as people, despite their lack of paper degrees, know how to be civilized and understand their responsibility. It is, however, a sad reality of our country that most, if not all, of the ‘educated’ persons have managed to grab some sort of degrees but have been failure to act sensibly and fulfil their responsibility.  For instance, the growing anarchy in the capital city where there is hardly any rule of law from the streets to government offices and so forth. And people are ready to blame and put fault on others.

I have heard of many of my friends those who return here in London after their brief visit to their relatives in Nepal saying that they had actually planned to stay there for a longer period but cut-short their stay as they ‘could not cope up with the crook society, people and the environment’. On their own words: We have to break the rule on the road to reach destination on time; Offer bribes to get official chores done;  Jump the queue on any dishonest pretext in order to get advantage over the crowd; Make money dishonestly or illegally if one has to survive. And the list goes on and on.

Certainly, my finger is pointing at the education providers (not only private, by now) who have not been able to inculcate in their students the basic of the basics things such as waiting at red light, own turn in a queue, not making dirt in public places, obey simply everyday rules for own and others’ safety, etc. Only advocating that only a robust government mechanism would help deal such evils and attributing all such mischiefs to ‘fluid political situation’ and/or transition is only a big joke which has done nothing but smearing ourselves. It shows how poorly educated we are and how uncivilized we have become lately.

There are many big personalities -- from prime ministers to secretaries, chief judge to lawyers, editors to professors, and bankers to industrialists – residing in the capital city. But why is the moral and social responsibility of the people living in the capital city is degrading every other day? Why is not only its environment polluted, but also the people’s minds and hearts?  Is there any way out of this academic paucity and mental poverty which our education providers can address in near future?  Although they say not to be pessimist, I’m afraid, but there are nothing yet as the harbinger of some hope to this effect.

Such a situation clearly proves that only grabbing some sort of degree is not enough for a society to be a civilized one. Having availed of all sort of technology such as internet, mobiles, television, access to state-of-the-art libraries, hospitals, schools, colleges is not enough to be civilized. We should also be able to fathom others in the society and trade respects. How do you feel if a person throws garbage, blows his nose and clear his throat in front of your door? If it is not acceptable to you, then why many of us are repeating the same? We should respect and treat others as we want to be treated, and always ready to learn something new and adapt ourselves to a different situation, which is the main ethos of the education.       [ This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ]

[The same article was also published in The Himalayan Times, national daily, in Kathmandu on December 25. You can follow this link to see the article: http://www.thehimalayantimes.com/fullNews.php?headline=Education+in+real+sense+A+million+dollar+question&NewsID=313992 ]

The views expressed in this article are the author's own and do not necessarily reflect Nepali Samaj UK’s editorial policy.

[Important note: Dear valued reader, you are also requested to send in your opinion on contemporary issues, and others related to Nepal and Nepalese, to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . We would appreciate if you can keep your article length around or below 1,000 words. It may be edited for the purpose of clarity and space. Besides, you can also mail us your photograph for publication.]

Be the Change

“When the spirit of entrepreneurship takes a social path, driven not only by the mantra of profit maximization but also by a willingness to contribute to the welfare of the community, it generates not only income for those involved but improves the humanity, a win-win situation that best defines social entrepreneurship”

By Simone Galiberti

When the spirit of entrepreneurship takes a social pathThis piece celebrates special ventures, a set of initiatives with different objectives and of diverse nature, but all united under the unique banner of social change, all inspired to offer sustainable solutions to common problems faced by Nepalis.  

Subarna Chitrakar with the Sungava Intellectually Challenged Women’s Vocational Training Centre has the bold vision of teaching girls with learning difficulties skills to be more confident and self-reliant--a chance to earn income through production of handicrafts, works of art and garments. 

Khom Raj with Inclusion Empowerment Center (IEC) Nepal provides employable and personality development trainings to blind and visually impaired in order to enhance their quality of life, build their confidence, and train them to be productive citizens. Swasulav is a venture promoted by Birendra Joshi that is developing an innovative micro-service model to bring health services to all, regardless of their financial and ethnic backgrounds. 

Lekhnath Sapkota with Fulchowki Dairy Farm finds new ways to increase milk production in the country, drastically reducing the milk dependency from neighbouring countries. 

The people behind these inspiring stories can be considered innovators and change makers, people who do not complain about the sorry status of the society but actively pursue an alternative path, the path of transformation through social entrepreneurship. The ultimate message is that innovative ideas can be sustainable and scalable, profoundly and deeply transforming our lives. 

This is a special week for those who dare to think outside the box as the Global Entrepreneurship Week (GEW), an initiative promoted by the Kauffman Foundation (GEW), is being celebrated all around the world. Over 40,000 events are planned, with millions of people striving to “bring ideas to life, drive economic development and expand human welfare”. 

When the spirit of entrepreneurship takes a social path, driven not only by the mantra of profit maximization but also by a willingness to contribute to the welfare of the community, it generates not only income for those involved but improves the humanity, a win-win situation that best defines social entrepreneurship. 

Incredibly, Nepal, for once, is a front runner in social entrepreneurship movement, thanks to the passion and dedication of a small group of people working at Change Fusion Nepal, the star social entrepreneurship promoting organization in Nepal. 

This week, Change Fusion Nepal under the leadership of Luna Thakur Shrestha, is teaming up with Nepal Business Initiative and others to organize the first ever Social Entrepreneurship Award with the financial support of Surya Nepal. A social entrepreneurship bazaar is also being held from Nov 18-19 where Subarna, Khom, Birendra, Lekhnath and many more will showcase their talent and passion for change. 

Their presentations will offer practical, hands-on solutions to a vast array of problem--healthcare hurdles, disability, rural electricity, waste management and ICT, to name a few. Besides this fantastic “road show” of innovation and inspiration, the celebrations will offer a variety of trainings and seminars from experts and spin doctors of social innovation. They will all be making a strong case for a stronger social entrepreneurship movement in Nepal. 

But how do you imbibe the spirit of social entrepreneurship? First of all you need funding, matched by mentoring, coaching efforts through social venture like Change Fusion which is always ready to step in to support promising ideas. Unfortunately, not much has been done by the traditional aid industry in Nepal to embrace the spirit of social entrepreneurship, but, hopefully, events like Social Entrepreneurship Award will break this trend and lead to more ventures and resources to build up a robust social innovation movement in Nepal.  

In order to become social entrepreneurs, you need a set of skills, expertise and hands-on learning, but that’s not enough. First, you have to use the power of your imagination, thinking the unthinkable, shifting your way of looking at the problems to a goal-oriented approach. A problem can also be seen as an unexplored opportunity that if picked up, nourished and supported through experimentation and piloting, can offer a meaningful breakthrough. 

You also need to live up to the rules of the 3Cs: be consistent, committed and courageous. Without the 3Cs, you can be a technical expert, you can be an incredible thinker but you will never be able to surf the wave of change. You also need to be patient, waiting for the right time, the right conditions but then, ultimately, you need to jump into the ocean and challenge the unforeseeable: the wave might overwhelm you, you might be drowned but you won’t be knocked down. 

Luna, her amazing team and the organizers of Social Entrepreneurship Award are proving that promoting change is possible and achievable. You just need to believe it and give it your all. I am sure if more people were able to think and live this way, the world would be a far better place.  

Welcome to the club of social changers. “No one knows what he can do till he tries” is my message to all of you interested in social entrepreneurship, where change is possible and within reach. Believe it. Luna and friends do. 

[The writer is a passionate about development works and strong believer in the volunteering based society. Now based in Nepal, he is associated with various social ventures. He can be reached at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ]

The views expressed in this article are the author's own and do not necessarily reflect Nepali Samaj UK’s editorial policy.

[Important note: Dear valued reader, you are also requested to send in your opinion on contemporary issues, and others related to Nepal and Nepalese, to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . We would appreciate if you can keep your article length around or below 1,000 words. It may be edited for the purpose of clarity and space. Besides, you can also mail us your photograph for publication.]

Defining terrorism

Do forms of psychological terrorism such as, feudalism, imperialism, and ideological repression not fall into the same violence category? They also induce psychological terror. Shouldn’t they also be categorized as violence?

By Archana Thapa

Gaurav KC

While the shocking news of Mumbai bomb blast was still fresh on peoples’ mind, the immediate news of Oslo blast and human causality followed through media channels. “Two blasts in two continents within a month! What can provoke anyone to such an extent!” wondered my daughter reading the coverage of the same in MSN headlines. Appalling extremity of human hate and anger that harmed innocent lives heightened her sense of anxiety. My automated response, “It is an act of terrorism,” could not calm her. More confused than ever, she shot back, “Why would anyone do such a thing? And what is terrorism?”  

Aware of the contradictions concerning the meaning of the word, I rummaged through the stacks of definitions to find a more fitting one: “The unlawful, threatened use of force and violence that coerce, intimidate or hurt people, often to achieve political, religious, or ideological objectives is called terrorism.” I was aware that my inadequate definition does not address historical violence perpetrated by Hitler, Stalin, Pol Pot, including various wars that also fall into the same category described as “terrorism.” For the moment, however, my explanation convinced my daughter and the whole issue was laid to rest.  

The discussion, however, stayed on my mind for some time. How could have I defined the term ‘terrorism’ and ‘violence’ exactly to the point when there are various new kinds of violence today that never existed before! Nietzsche had rightly written that things that have no history can only be defined appropriately. Terrorism and violence, needless to say, have had a long history and it is difficult to contain them within one definition. Modern forms of violence are taking on a millenarian and apocalyptic tone. Our present society is witnessing the emergence of newer forms of violence based on ecological, cultural, quasi-religious, political and many other forms that are criminal in nature. The tricky part is where to place them.  

Do forms of psychological terrorism such as, feudalism, imperialism, and ideological repression not fall into the same violence category? They also induce psychological terror. Shouldn’t they also be categorized as violence? Also, the defining line blurs when the concerns of army and guerrilla warfare, political terrorism and criminal gangs, and homegrown terrorism and state-sponsored terrorism occur.  

There is not a relatively clear dividing line between good violence and bad violence. The point to note is that however complicated the definition be, terrorism never becomes a synonym for civil war, banditry, or guerrilla warfare. Wonder why! If the sufferers condemn the motives and characters of terrorism, the perpetrators justify their violence with “legitimate” reasons. During the 1960s and 70s, when many understood act of terrorism as the extreme left wing inspiration, they also blamed establishment of unjust societies as the prime reason for terrorism. The assumption, then, was that the just and ideal structures of political, social and economy will automatically erase terrorism from the face of humanity. Such people reasoned terrorists’ attacks as justice-seekers’ desperate resistance against the intolerable conditions of unjust societies. But terrorism today no longer represents merely the justice seekers’ reactions of ultimatum; rather it represents extreme right and left ideologies resulting in hate campaign. The earlier definitions fail to fit in the newer contexts of the present.

The first written use of ‘terrorism’ and ‘terrorist’ occurred in 1795 and was related to the “Reign of Terror” instituted by the French government. The Jacobins who led the government at the time claimed themselves as revolutionaries; nevertheless, their successors later pronounced those violent revolutionary activities as terrorist activities. Much painstaking effort has gone into defining and rephrasing the term since then, yet none can encompass the phenomenon in one single definition.  
In many circumstances the armed groups justify their use of terror as legitimate resistance against ruling powers.  

Things remain unexplained: If violent act igniting terror is to be considered terrorist act then how can one define states’ use of violence during colonial struggles for liberation? And, if violence terrorizes public then how can one explain the attack on property or infrastructure because a blast or attack cannot frighten inanimate objects? And, can threats of harm be considered terrorist act where the act of violence is not materialized and merely the possibility of it terrorizes public? We can twist and turn the definitions as much as we want, but cannot wring one definition that explains the phenomenon well.  

Indeed, historical tyrannies did not cause any less terror and were no less violent. However, with the invention of modern instruments of mass destruction, human existence is getting more precarious than ever. Today science and technologies have made enormous progress, yet human nature has not changed much for better. There are as much fanaticism and madness (or may be more than ever) as there were in the past. Generally, many terrorists’ acts are motivated and influenced by some political ‘self-interest’. Thus, there is the difference between violence induced with political agendas and non-political violence resulting in murder or casualties of road accidents. 

Furthermore, the concept of terrorism also supports the idea that violent terrorist acts can never be inflicted by the state. Due to the denial of the fact that a state can be a terrorist, many hostile and violent activities of states easily get off the hook with the interpretation ‘struggle of good against evil’. The shaky assumptions such as violence inflicted on civilians is terrorism, and violence perpetrated on army/soldiers is warfare blurs the thin line between terrorism and self-defence.  

Often various legal, moral, or behavioural perspectives are used to interpret and to credit or discredit those acts of violence. While various legal and moral causes are used to justify or to condemn terrorist acts, to me, the idea of ‘just terrorism’ seems simply bizarre. Whatever be the ‘just’ reason and however justified or validated violent actions be, nothing surmounts the pain and grief that results from such acts. I wonder how long will we cloud our reasoning with exhaustive definitions and illusive interpretations? While the phenomenon of terrorism may signify different meaning to different people and achieving a consensus may not be an important end in itself, for me, terrorism is much more than the violent acts committed by those we disapprove of.  

[The writer is doing her Ph.D in English from Tribhuvan University, Kathmandu, Nepal. She can be contacted at This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ]


The views expressed in this article are the author's own and do not necessarily reflect Nepali Samaj UK’s editorial policy.

[Important note: Dear valued reader, you are also requested to send in your opinion on contemporary issues, and others related to Nepal and Nepalese, to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . We would appreciate if you can keep your article length around or below 1,000 words. It may be edited for the purpose of clarity and space. Besides, you can also mail us your photograph for publication.]

Migration: A win-win approach

Despite important contributions to their countries of origin and destination, they continue to encounter inhuman maladies. The proactive adaptation of a win-win approach by all stakeholders can create a favorable environment for Nepal to benefit from this era of global exchange, as a labour supplying country.

Gaurav KC

By Gaurav KC

Nepal is a labour rich country, which supplies thousands of unskilled and semiskilled workers to global cities. Post 1990, Nepali labourers have migrated to different destinations, contributing to the formation of global mega cities. Looking at cities in the Arab Gulf allows for an excellent understanding of the growth of these mega cities. Wealth accumulation has stimulated large flows of skilled westerners and unskilled workers from countries like ours. Nepali labourers along with other foreign workers are a major impetus in the creation of today’s global mega cities in the gulf. Factories, construction sites, hotels and the domestic sector are where Nepali migrant workers— whose labour is cheap in the eyes of employers—conglomerate.

Despite important contributions to their countries of origin and destination, they continue to encounter inhuman maladies. The proactive adaptation of a win-win approach by all stakeholders can create a favorable environment for Nepal to benefit from this era of global exchange, as a labour supplying country.

Anthropologist Vera N. remarks that “South Asian migrant experiences have been shown to be richly permeated by experiences of discrimination, both by Gulf citizens and Western expatriates”. Cases of Nepali labourers being poorly paid, ill treated, and working in dangerous conditions also have been widely covered by Nepali dailies and the subject of several documentaries and research work. On the flip side, better income opportunities for Nepali migrants, contribution to the Nepali remittance economy and the subsequent improved lifestyles of migrant workers’ family members are the positive aspects of Nepali labour migration.

In this context, a common question among Nepalis is whether Nepal as a nation can benefit from this era of labour mobility, whereby the positive far outweighs the negative. To answer this question, we should not understand migration and its associated consequences as the automatic result of particular policies, and simply point fingers at governments alone. Rather, we should attempt to understand the dynamics of this very complex process consisting of a variety of agents including the state, the employer, the manpower agencies, the middle men who introduce migrants to the agencies, and humanitarian organizations dealing with migration issues.

It is not necessary that direct benefit to all these stake holders shrink with a consorted effort towards minimizing hardships faced by contracted labour migrants from Nepal.

Beginning with the role humanitarian organizations can play, and with the assumption that every such agency’s ultimate objective is to make their work obsolete, there are several avenues through which humanitarian work can assist in reducing hardships faced by migrant labourers.  For example, creation of an easily accessible space whereby potential migrants can learn about this kind of labour and prepare themselves for the obstacles they may face, is most necessary.

While pursuing personal research on the topic, I came across a letter sent by a migrant to his family where the migrant mentions that upon returning to Nepal, he will “cut the middle man into pieces.” This is a feeling commonly shared by Nepali labour migrants. The middle man, known as Dalal, is responsible for finding potential and often rural migrant workers and putting them in touch with various opportunities abroad in return for a handsome commission. In this regard, there is an urgency to educate these middle men about the potential risk-free and dignified earning that can be made though the dissemination of authentic information and clear explanation of choices available.

The manpower agencies that are actually sending labourers abroad should focus on practicing honesty and transparency. Recruitment is a booming industry, and such agencies can negotiate with their clients for better wages for the labourers, without increasing the service charges to be paid by the potential labourer. Rather than exaggerating available opportunities, truthful dissemination of information will work in their benefit in the long run.  Sound orientation for the workers before departure is a must in this process. With such simple structural changes, they can slowly distance themselves from their identities, which are often seen as fraudulent by many. They can turn into sincere service providers.

The employers on the other hand, can benefit by simply adopting the principles of behavioral management. They have to work towards creating a safe working environment for employees and motivating them, which will in turn amount to an increment in productivity.  They must abide by international labour laws when deciding wage structures and what consists of a healthy work environment for their employees. The international humanitarian organization also has a role here in putting pressure on host governments and employing companies to comply with international laws.

Likewise, the Nepali state can do a lot in improving the situation of labour migrants and the country’s economy. Perhaps its most crucial role has to be in equipping itself with accurate and up-to-date information on the number and whereabouts of Nepali migrant workers. The state should put a priority on identifying and closing illegal labour migration channels, as migrants who pass through such channels tend to be most vulnerable to exploitation. The developing of labour friendly policies and effective mechanisms to ensure activities in accordance to the policies is also necessary. The state should be in a position whereby it holds strong bargaining power with labour receiving countries as in the cases of India, Philippines, Sri Lanka, and Pakistan. Diplomatic state mechanisms in labour also need to be active in looking after its populace in a foreign country. Nepali labour migrants often complain about the lack of efficiency of their embassies in terms of functioning. And most importantly, rather than letting remittance money be used for material gain alone and burn like coal; the state should encourage entrepreneurship among returnees.

[KC teaches Sociology/ Anthropology at Orbit International College and researches migration issues. The same article can also be found in ekantipur website.]

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

The views expressed in this article are the author's own and do not necessarily reflect Nepali Samaj UK’s editorial policy.

[Important note: Dear valued reader, you are also requested to send in your opinion on contemporary issues, and others related to Nepal and Nepalese, to This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it . We would appreciate if you can keep your article length around or below 1,000 words. It may be edited for the purpose of clarity and space. Besides, you can also mail us your photograph for publication.]

Compare Cheap Fllights to Nepal

‘Let’s Walk for Nepal in London

‘Let’s Walk for Nepal in London

In a joint effort of Help Nepal Network and Grassroot Movement in Nepal (GMIN), the first-ever Walk for Nepal event is being organised at the Royal Richmond Park in London on the 27th of July. Jay gur... Read more

|| Hits:5774

'Nepal is now being promoted as cultural mélange'

'Nepal is now being promoted as cultural mélange'

Dhruba KC is Honorary Representative of Nepal Tourism Board (NTB) to the UK. He has been involved in promoting Nepal through various programmes and took active role during Nepal Tourism Year (2011) an... Read more

|| Hits:5126

‘Hundi is the only problem faced by all of us regardless of so mu…

‘Hundi is the only problem faced by all of us regardless of so much of awareness’

Yogendra Shrestha is Director of Quick and Easy Remittance company. A graduate from London Metropolitan University and Chartered Certified Accountant, he established this company in 2010. Read more

|| Hits:8067

Face-to-face with Nepalese Entrepreneur Pashupati Bhandari

Face-to-face with Nepalese Entrepreneur Pashupati Bhandari

I'm proud that we are able to represent the Nepalese community and showcase our hospitality with our fine dining approach...' -Bhandari Pashupati Bhandari is a well known name among the successful Ne... Read more

|| Hits:7612

Horse sense

Horse sense

Of course, the president will ride an elephant and so will the prime minister. For the fun of it, imagine our president, prime minister and other dignitaries riding on a fully decorated hauda: a sea... Read more

|| Hits:6322

Education in real sense

Education in real sense

Having availed of all sort of modern technology such as internet, mobiles, television, access to state-of-the-art libraries, hospitals, schools, colleges is not enough to be civilized. We should ... Read more

|| Hits:5966

Be the Change

Be the Change

“When the spirit of entrepreneurship takes a social path, driven not only by the mantra of profit maximization but also by a willingness to contribute to the welfare of the community, it generates ... Read more

|| Hits:3351

"We should not forget Nepalipan: to remain united and help others…

Mahanta Shrestha, Founder President of Non-Resident Nepalese Association (NRNA), is a successful entrepreneur in the United Kingdom. He led a bilateral trade mission to Nepal to explore investment ... Read more

|| Hits:4785

Defining terrorism

Defining terrorism

Do forms of psychological terrorism such as, feudalism, imperialism, and ideological repression not fall into the same violence category? They also induce psychological terror. Shouldn’t they also ... Read more

|| Hits:4211

Migration: A win-win approach

Migration: A win-win approach

Despite important contributions to their countries of origin and destination, they continue to encounter inhuman maladies. The proactive adaptation of a win-win approach by all stakeholders can c... Read more

|| Hits:5311